Filming as a minor practice in recovery from addiction

Filming as a minor practice in recovery from addiction

Dr Nicole VitelloneZoom

Over the past decade, UK policies on drug use and treatment have shifted from a model of 'Harm Reduction' to a model of ‘Recovery' that assists people to lead drug-free lives. Whilst the policy of recovery has been addressed by researchers in some detail less attention has been paid to the range of methods and variety of practices that accompany ‘recovery’, as well as the actual practices of recovery within existing drug services. In addressing the sociological literature on recovery the aim of this presentation is to analyse the different uses of methods for engaging the policy, practice and concept of recovery from addiction to drugs and alcohol. The question that informs this paper is how researchers participate in knowledge production and the possibility of building alternative modes of knowledge that connect social scientists to service users through the development of inventive methods. To do so we consider the role of the sociologist in engaging social research methods in creative practices of ‘recovery’ from addiction. Drawing on a research collaboration ‘Rehearsing Recovery’ with social scientists from the University of Liverpool and the visual artist and film maker Melanie Manchot we trace the impact of the development and use of filming as a collective method in reconfiguring the relationship between social research, visual art and knowledge practices. In tracing and evaluating the objects and subjects of our research we show what is at stake in fostering interdisciplinarity and the consequences of interdisciplinary research methods for producing minor practices of recovery.

Centre for Humanities and Social Sciences of Health, Technology and Medicine, University of Liverpool, UK
Wed 14:30 - 16:00
Creative Methodologies, Visual Culture
Standard paper