Re-Facing the De-faced Doctor; Injustice and the Wounded Healer

Re-Facing the De-faced Doctor; Injustice and the Wounded Healer

Dr Linda MillerZoom

Contemporary images of healthcare practitioners(1,2,3,4) depict individuals as faceless . Professional codes mandate that practitioners “make the care of the patient your first concern”(5,6) ; being self-effacing. Healthcare, medical humanities and media discourses increasingly generalise and refer to the healthcare professions as a homogenous entity. Denial of individual particularity of the practitioner , the unique nature of every relational healthcare encounter and the dual identity of practitioner as patient too, the wounded healer is unjust.
This de-facing is considered in terms of art, professional “mystique”(7) , care ethics, practitioner wellbeing and care quality. The role of reflective practice ,art and practitioner testimonies in re-facing the practitioner is considered through the object relations lens of Donald Winnicott. Creative reflective practices are restorative (8) ,enhance self-efficacy and celebrate the spontaneous reciprocity of relational, compassionate care, seeing and being seen.

References
1. Kings Fund Organisational culture https://www.kingsfund.org.uk/topics/organisational-culture accessed 14.2.21. 2.The RCGP Curriculum ;Being a General Practitioner. accessed 14.7.2020. 3.HEE Infographic accessed 2018.4.. UCL/HEE ISLA course graphic.2020
5 https://www.gmc-uk.org/ethical-guidance/ethical-guidance-for-doctors/good-medical-practice/duties-of-a-doctor#knowledge-skills-and-performance
6 https://www.nmc.org.uk/standards/code/
7. Cary Cherniss Staff Burnout :Job stress in the Human Services 1981, New York, Praeger.
8.Brigid Proctor Group Supervision a guide to creative practice 2008, London, Sage .

Birkbeck, University of London, UK
Thu 09:30 - 11:00
COVID-19, Narrative
Standard paper